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36 Hours in the Jura Slideshow

36 Hours in the Jura Slideshow


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Comté at Fort St. Antoine

Similar to Gruyère, Comté is a type of raw cow's milk cheese with a sweet, nutty flavor. One wheel of Comté weighs roughly 80 pounds and takes about 530 liters of milk to create. To achieve its texture and shape, Comté is aged for a period of 10 to 14 months.

Baumes les Messieurs

Baumes les Messieurs is a village of verdant valleys in Jura. The area offers walking trails, cliffs to explore, and camping sites.

Best of Château-Chalon

Château-Chalon is the designated origin for wines made in Jura. These wines are created using only one grape variety, the savagnin grape. The savagnin grapes in vin jaune are aged in oak barrels for a period of six to 10 years.

Comté casting at La Maison du Comté

Located in Poligny, the La Maison du Comté offers guests an inside look into the origins of Comté cheese and how it’s made. The tour costs around €4 and ends with a savory Comté tasting.

Homemade Bowling Alley at la Petite Échelle

Auberge la Petite Échelle is quaint inn in Jura that was once a nunnery and is now frequented by shepherds and snowshoers. The "inn" is eco-friendly and includes a compost toilet, giant yurts, and a homemade bowling alley. The cost of a one night stay is €16.

Rösti and Sausage at Auberge la Petite Échelle

Auberge la Petite Échelle offers a variety of authentic French eats. Diners can feast on dishes such as a bubbling pot of herb- and pink peppercorn-flecked Comté fondue, and traditional Swiss rösti topped with rounds of that rustic Morteau sausage,

Norbert Bournez at Auberge la Petite Échelle

Norbert Bournez is the owner of Auberge la Petite Échelle, a mountain farm that was taken over by the Bournez family in 1987. For six months out of the year, Norbert and his family live in the hostel.

Cheese Course at Hostellerie St.-Germaine

In addition to cheese plates, the restaurant at the Hostellerie St.-Germaine also serves up Morteau sausage, lamb, fois gras, river fish, and other seafood. Other features of the hotel include selections of Jura wines and a shady terrace to eat outside in the summer.

Domaine Macle

Domaine Macle is a great place within Château-Chalon to taste the signature flavor of vin jaune wine. The average price for a bottle of Domaine Macle is $41.

Fort St. Antoine

Fort St. Antoine is a former military fort that was converted in the 1960s into a cheese-aging warehouse. Cheese within the warehouse is left to age for 13 to 18 months in order to achieve its rich flavor profiles.

Le Grand Jardin

Le Grand Jardin is a hotel and restaurant located in the region of Baume Les Messieurs. The menu offers up delights such as fresh lake trout and wild hazelnut salad and Morteau sausage in a sauce of Comté cheese and savagnin wine.

Life in Jura

Jura is home to a picturesque landscape that is perfect for summertime activities, such as sailing, hiking, and camping. The valleys are also sprinkled with lakes and waterfalls for swimming and fishing.

Salin Les Bains

Salin Les Bains is a region of Jura home to a legendary 18th-century salt mine that is now a historical museum on the craft of salt mining. Other activities within the area include hiking the 853-meter high Mont Poupet, paragliding, and indulging at the spa.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

Over the past two and a half years I became comfortable baking rustic breads using wild yeast. The baguette, however, gave me lesson after lesson in humility. Baguettes are deceptively simple to prepare, but if you seek a bread with Parisian quality, then each step of preparation must be flawless: bulk fermentation, shaping, final proofing, and baking. I’ve tried many recipes, but they never quite matched the superb baguettes of the 7th Arrondisement, where we used to live.

That all changed during our recent trip home. I was looking forward to baking a sourdough bread in our own kitchen, and decided on sourdough baguettes. I followed the detailed instructions of TxFarmer, one of the most accomplished bakers of The Fresh Loaf Forum, and voila‘, the baguettes from my own oven were just the way I’d hoped for…



TxFARMER’s 36 HOUR SOURDOUGH BAGUETTES

(recipe found at The Fresh Loaf forum)

150 g very active sourdough starter (at 100% hydration)
425g all purpose flour
300g cold water
10g salt

Mix water and flour into a lumpy mass, cover and place in the fridge for 12 hours.

Remove from the fridge, add the starter and salt to the dough, and mix until distributed. The dough will be very sticky, but you should resist the temptation to add more flour. Allow it to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours, kneading by the “stretch and fold method” every 30 minutes. The dough may rise about 30% of its total volume. Place the dough covered in the fridge for 24 hours.

Remove the dough from the fridge and let it warm up for 1 to 2 hours – you want it to rise but not get overly bubbly, because that will make shaping very tricky later. Divide the dough in four pieces, taking care not to deflate it too much. Place each piece over floured parchment paper, and let it relax for 40 minutes.

Shape each one as a baguette (for a nice tutorial, click here), proof for 30 to 50 minutes, and bake with initial steam at 460 F for 25 minutes.

Let it completely cool before slicing.

to print the recipe, click here

Comments: When Txfarmer described this recipe as “everything I know in one bread,” she meant it. She baked multiple batches to perfect it, and made it clear that you need a good “feel” for the dough to get good results. That’s why the initial stretch and fold cycle varies from 2 to 3 hours, depending on the ‘strength” (gluten development) of your dough. The final rise at room temperature will also change depending on the temperature of your kitchen, and how much “lift” the starter provided during the 24 hour fermentation in the fridge. If you are new to bread baking, particularly using wild yeast, all these variables are intimidating. But if you’ve baked your share of sourdough breads, then consider making a batch of these baguettes, which taste incredibly good! The crumb is open, the taste surprisingly mellow, with an almost “sweet” component, hard to imagine in a sourdough.

You may have noticed that my individual baguettes ended with different types of crusts. The difference lies in how I generated steam during baking. Two baguettes were baked with an inverted roasting pan (sightly wet) on top: they developed a nice, shiny crust, with a “caramel” color. The other two baguettes were baked in a perforated pan, with steam coming from water poured in a cast iron pan placed at the bottom of the oven. Their crust is less shiny, but they had more oven spring. My favorite method is the inverted roasting pan, but it has a major drawback: I can only bake one baguette at a time.

If you dream of perfecting baguettes at home, you MUST try TxFarmer’s recipe. Many bakers already did, and raved about it (check the discussion at The Fresh Loaf Forum by clicking here).

I am submitting this post to Susan’s Yeastspotting event…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

CANTINHO BRASILEIRO

BAGUETTES DE 36 HORAS
(receita de TxFarmer)

150 g de “sourdough starter” com 100% de hidratacao
425g de farinha de trigo comum
300g (ml) de agua fria
10g de sal

Misture a água e a farinha em uma tigela, ate’ que fique uma massa nao muito homogenea. Cubra com plastico e coloque na geladeira por 12 horas.

Retire da geladeira, adicione o sal e o “sourdough starter” à massa e misture até ficar bem homogeneo. A massa sera’ bem pegajosa, mas resista à tentação de adicionar mais farinha. Deixe crescer em temperatura ambiente por 2 a 3 horas, usando o metodo de esticar e dobrar a massa a cada meia hora. A massa pode crescer cerca de 30% do seu volume total. Coloque a massa coberta na geladeira por 24 horas.

Retire a massa da geladeira e deixe aquecer por 1 a 2 horas. Divida a massa em quatro pedaços, tomando cuidado para não perder muito do volume adquirido durante a fermentacao. Coloque cada pedaço em papel manteiga polvilhado com farinha e deixe descansar por 40 minutos.

Forme cada um como uma baguette, e deixe fermentar por mais 30 a 50 minutos. Asse em forno bem quente por 25 minutos, usando vapor nos primeiros 10 minutos.


Watch the video: JURA Stone Setting Watch bezel Stainless Steel Part2 Setting.


Comments:

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